MPP Seminar | A Causal Concentration-Response Function for Air Pollution: Evidence from Wildfire Smoke by David Molitor – School of Economics MPP Seminar | A Causal Concentration-Response Function for Air Pollution: Evidence from Wildfire Smoke by David Molitor – School of Economics

MPP Seminar | A Causal Concentration-Response Function for Air Pollution: Evidence from Wildfire Smoke by David Molitor

School of Economics

 Invites you to a

Microeconometrics & Public Policy seminar presented by

David Molitor

(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

A Causal Concentration-Response Function for Air Pollution: Evidence from Wildfire Smoke


Friday 1 December 2023

12.00pm – 1.00pm

 Seminar Room 650
A02 Social Sciences Building

Camperdown Campus
The University of Sydney NSW 2006

 

The shape of the concentration-response relationship between air pollution exposure and human health is central to determining efficient pollution regulations, especially for countries where pollution levels are already low and further abatement may be very costly. We provide the first causal estimates of the concentration-response relationship between exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mortality, exploiting variation from exposure to wildfire smoke. Using a novel satellite-based dataset of daily smoke plume coverage for the entire U.S. from 2007 to 2017, we find that drifting wildfire smoke is pervasive throughout the US, accounts for over 20% of average PM2.5 concentrations, and produces air quality shocks of widely varying intensity. We link this variation to daily mortality rates using administrative data on 100% of the Medicare population. We find that the concentration-response relationship between PM2.5 and mortality caused by wildfire smoke is concave: small air pollution shocks have proportionally larger mortality effects than large air pollution shocks. Methodologically, our findings highlight nonlinear treatment effects as an important reason other than identification issues for why instrumental-variable (IV) and ordinary-least-squares (OLS) estimates of the mortality effect of pollution might differ. From a policy perspective, our results point to large benefits of additional air quality improvements in the United States.

For further information contact: Microeconometrics & Public Policy Seminar Coordinator
Dr Gregor Pfeifer & Dr Rebecca McKibbin

For all upcoming seminars in School of Economics see Our events and Calendar

Date

Dec 01 2023
Expired!

Time

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

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